Now available on YouTube: Our Yom HaShoah commemorations co-sponsored with Or Hadash and the We Are Here! Foundation.

Or Hadash Yom HaShoah Community Observance

Hear the personal story of Holocaust Survivor Peter Stearn.

Click here to view the program: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyVyayJhS-U

“Yom HaShoah Global Commemoration”

HAMEC and our partners at the WE ARE HERE! Foundation in Perth Australia,
Jewish Partisans’ Educational Foundation, San Francisco, USA and World ORT, London, United Kingdom are proud to present this event for Yom HaShoah.

Click here to view the program: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSZt8Rb1STUuSwAgUWVQdkA

We Are Here Logo

The “Yom HaShoah Global Commemoration,” features students and educators from nine schools in six countries.

Holocaust Survivors presenting testimony of experiences include Miriam Lichterman and HAMEC speakers Daniel Goldsmith and Ruth Hartz.

Holocaust Museum and Education Center

President Biden’s Proclamation on Days of Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust, 2021

On Yom HaShoah — Holocaust Remembrance Day — we stand in solidarity with the Jewish people in America, Israel, and around the world to remember and reflect on the horrors of the Holocaust. An estimated six million Jews perished alongside millions of other innocent victims — Roma and Sinti, Slavs, disabled persons, LGBTQ+ individuals, and others — systematically murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators in one of the cruelest and most heinous campaigns in human history.

We honor the memories of precious lives lost, contemplate the incomprehensible wound to our humanity, mourn for the communities broken and scattered, and embrace those who survived the Holocaust — some of whom are still with us today, continuing to embody extraordinary resilience after all these years. Having borne witness to the depths of evil, these survivors remind us of the vital refrain: “never again.” The history of the Holocaust is forever seared into the history of humankind, and it is the shared responsibility of all people to ensure that the horrors of the Shoah can never be erased from our collective memory.

It is painful to remember. It is human nature to want to leave the past behind. But in order to prevent a tragedy like the Holocaust from happening again, we must share the truth of this dark period with each new generation. All of us must understand the depravity that is possible when governments back policies fueled by hatred, when we dehumanize groups of people, and when ordinary people decide that it is easier to look away or go along than to speak out. Our children and grandchildren must learn where those roads lead, so that the commitment of “never again” lives strongly in their hearts.

I remember learning about the horrors of the Holocaust from my father when I was growing up, and I have sought to impart that history to my own children and grandchildren in turn. I have taken them on separate visits to Dachau, so that they could see for themselves what happened there, and to impress on them the urgency to speak out whenever they witness anti-Semitism or any form of ethnic and religious hatred, racism, homophobia, or xenophobia. The legacy of the Holocaust must always remind us that silence in the face of such bigotry is complicity — remembering, as Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel wrote, that there are moments when “indifference to evil is worse than evil itself.”

Those who survived the Holocaust are an inspiration to every single one of us. Yet they continue to live with the unique mental and physical scars from the unconscionable trauma of the Holocaust, with many survivors in the United States living in poverty. When I served as Vice President, I helped secure Federal funding for grants to support Holocaust survivors — but we must do more to pursue justice and dignity for survivors and their heirs. We have a moral imperative to recognize the pain survivors carry, support them, and ensure that their memories and experiences of the Holocaust are neither denied nor distorted, and that the lessons for all humanity are never forgotten.

Holocaust survivors and their descendants — and each child, grandchild, and great-grandchild of those who lost their lives — are living proof that love and hope will always triumph over murder and destruction. Every child and grandchild of a survivor is a testament to resilience, and a living rebuke to those who sought to extinguish the future of the Jewish people and others who were targeted.

Yom HaShoah reminds us not only of the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, but also reinforces our ongoing duty to counter all forms of dehumanizing bigotry directed against the LGBTQ+, disability, and other marginalized communities. While hate may never be permanently defeated, it must always be confronted and condemned. When we recognize the fundamental human dignity of all people, we help to build a more just and peaceful world. In the memory of all those who were lost, and in honor of all those who survived, we must continue to work toward a better, freer, and more just future for all humankind.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR., President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 4 through April 11, 2021, as a week of observance of the Days of Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust, and call upon the people of the United States to observe this week and pause to remember victims and survivors of the Holocaust. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of April, two thousand twenty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-fifth.
                             

JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR.

Sunday’s Yom HaShoah events

Please join the Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center and our partners for these Yom HaShoah remembrance and events! Details and registration links can be found below.
Yom HaShoah Commemoration Presented by Or Hadash and HAMEC Sunday, April 11 10:30am EST Streaming Link
Jewish Federation Commemoration Ceremony Sunday, April 11, 1:00pm EST Zoom Registration Join the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia to commemorate the six million Jews who perished in the Holocaust and to honor the Survivors in our communities. The event will feature performances by Steven Skybell of Folksbiene (from the revival of Fiddler on the Roof) and our Israeli Partnership2Gether community; reflections from Holocaust survivors, local politicians and community members; and prayers and music.

Wherever you are, our Survivors and Liberators are ready to address your school, civic group or congregation–virtually.

Holocaust Memorial, Miami Beach, Florida

Arkansas has joined the growing roster of States–16 through legislation and more States by administrative regulations–which now mandate Holocaust Education.  HAMEC can provide virtual programs for your school, congregation and civic group. Wherever you are – be it the United States, Canada, India, Brazil, South Africa, Australia, the United Kingdom, and now Nigeria –  we can to serve you world-wide.

Through Google Meet, Skype and Zoom, we can bring the latest in Holocaust education to you.  Request a program today.

Hate never takes a vacation and neither do we.

Arkansas becomes 16th State to mandate Holocaust education

By COLE ZIMMERMAN, 40/29 News, April 8, 2021. Click for full report.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. —

A bill requiring Arkansas schools to educate students about the Holocaust was signed into law by Governor Asa Hutchinson Thursday. The bill passed unanimously in the Arkansas House of Representatives and the Arkansas Senate, and received bi-partisan support.

“We want to learn from our history, so we don’t repeat it,” said Senator Bart Hester, the lead sponsor of the bill.

The law requires schools to generate an understanding about the causes and effects of the horrific event, and develop dialogue about the ramifications of bigotry, stereotyping, and discrimination.

“With Holocaust survivors now aging we have fewer and fewer survivors and it is incredibly important that we make sure to honor their memory and honor their struggle and honor the lives that were lost by teaching folks about what happened, and what can happen when hate manifests itself on such a large scale,” said Toby Klein, the secretary of the Holocaust education legislative process.

Schools will be required to teach the lessons between 5th and 12th grade.

“Schools are going to get their own choice working with the department of education on how they are going to teach the curriculum, but the intent is that it will be taught every year,” said Senator Hester. “Our educators are fabulous at what they do, they will figure out the best way to teach their kids. We just want to make sure that this subject matter is covered.”

Hester told 40/29 News that the law will go into effect for the 2023 school year.

Franz Josef Huber–Nazi police chief in Vienna–spied for West Germany

By BBC, April 8, 2021. Click for full report.

Franz Josef Huber archive pic
image captionFranz Josef Huber ran the Gestapo secret police in Vienna

A Nazi SS general responsible for deporting tens of thousands of Jews to death camps worked for West German intelligence after World War Two, shielded from prosecution.

The protection given to Franz Josef Huber was revealed by the German spy service BND, in archives seen by German public broadcaster ARD.

Huber ran the Gestapo in Vienna, the Nazis’ second-biggest secret police HQ after Berlin.

The US military knew about his crimes.

Huber took charge of the Gestapo in Vienna immediately after Adolf Hitler annexed Austria in March 1938 and held that post until late 1944.

Adapt and survive

When the Allies occupied the disintegrating Nazi Reich, Huber was on a US wanted list and was arrested by US forces in May 1945.

He was detained for nearly three years, but the US military found him to be co-operative and released him in 1948, so he escaped prosecution for war crimes, the New York Times reports. The paper was given access to ARD’s material.

BND historian Bodo Hechelhammer told ARD that at that time “the Cold War was looming, so above all they were of course looking for hardline anti-communists.

“Unfortunately all too often they searched for, and found, such types among former Nazis.”

From 1955 to 1967 Huber was employed by West German intelligence, the BND. Originally it was the Gehlen Organisation, headed by ex-Nazi officer Reinhard Gehlen, who had run agents on the Eastern Front.

Huber was pensioned off in 1967, as the BND had concluded that he could not be kept on, lest his role “endanger the service”. He drew a German civil service pension, but also worked for an office equipment company, living under his own name in Munich until his death aged 73.

Among Nazi elite

In Nazi-run Austria Huber worked hand-in-hand with Adolf Eichmann, who set up the Central Agency for Jewish Emigration in Vienna. It handled the mass deportation of Jews.

Huber (front, C) with some of his Gestapo team in Vienna
image captionHuber (front, C) with some of his Gestapo team in Vienna

One of Huber’s first jobs as Gestapo chief in Vienna was to send Jewish community leaders to Dachau concentration camp near Munich. Before joining the Nazi Party in 1937 he had been a senior police officer in Munich, his native city.

After the war Israeli agents captured Eichmann – one of the key organisers of the Holocaust – in Argentina. He was tried in Israel and executed in 1962.

Huber had a Gestapo staff of 900 in Vienna. An estimated 50,000 people were brutally interrogated by them there, at the notorious Hotel Métropole. The hotel, one of Vienna’s finest before its seizure by the Nazis, had opened in 1873 at Morzinplatz. It was demolished by explosions in 1945 when Soviet forces occupied the city.

Vienna's Hotel Métropole (1900 photo)
image captionVienna’s Hotel Métropole (1900 photo) became the Gestapo HQ

The overall Gestapo chief was Heinrich Müller, who was in the Berlin bunker during Adolf Hitler’s last days, but then disappeared in 1945. His fate is still unknown.

A report from the US government archives reveals that, when questioned by the US occupation forces, Huber admitted visiting several concentration camps: Dachau in 1936, Sachsenhausen in 1936, and Mauthausen in 1939.

“But, he said, he had never seen any cruelty there, that the laws of humanity were always his highest rule of conduct,” the report, called Hitler’s Shadow, says. In fact, inmates of those camps were beaten, starved and tortured by SS guards, and few survived.

Photos from 1941 in the German state archives (Bundesarchiv) also show Huber at Mauthausen in the entourage of SS commander Heinrich Himmler.

Huber pictured with other SS commanders, 1 Nov 39
image captionHuber (L) with other SS commanders in 1939, L-R: Arthur Nebe, Heinrich Himmler, Reinhard Heydrich and Heinrich Müller

In 1945, a German denazification tribunal in Nuremberg acquitted Huber of all responsibility for crimes, the report says. Yet Nuremberg was where some Nazi leaders were tried by the Allies and 10 were executed in 1946.

The US military’s main interest in Huber at the time was in trying to locate fugitive Gestapo chief Müller. Huber’s work for West German intelligence began after his release from US custody.

Stefan Meining, a historian involved in the ARD research, says the BND “knew exactly that Huber was not some petty Gestapo murderer but an SS general, who moved within the innermost circles of the Nazi terror apparatus and was responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of Jews and opponents of the regime”…

Yom HaShoah events

Please join the Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center and our partners for a week of Yom HaShoah remembrance and events! Details and registration links can be found below.
Holocaust Survivor Presentation with Daniel Goldsmith Event presented by Friedman JCC, Temple Israel and Temple B’nai B’rith Program presented by the ADL and HAMEC Thursday, April 8, 7:00pm EST Zoom Link (No Registration)
Yom HaShoah Commemoration Presented by Or Hadash and HAMEC Sunday, April 11 10:30am EST Streaming Link
Jewish Federation Commemoration Ceremony Sunday, April 11, 1:00pm EST Zoom Registration Join the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia to commemorate the six million Jews who perished in the Holocaust and to honor the Survivors in our communities. The event will feature performances by Steven Skybell of Folksbiene (from the revival of Fiddler on the Roof) and our Israeli Partnership2Gether community; reflections from Holocaust survivors, local politicians and community members; and prayers and music.

Now available on YouTube: Yom HaShoah 2021 Global Commemoration

Click here to view the program: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSZt8Rb1STUuSwAgUWVQdkA

HAMEC and our partners at the WE ARE HERE! Foundation in Perth Australia,
Jewish Partisans’ Educational Foundation, San Francisco, USA and World ORT, London, United Kingdom are proud to present this event for Yom HaShoah.

We Are Here Logo

The “Yom HaShoah Global Commemoration,” features students and educators from nine schools in six countries.

Yom HaShoah 2021 Commemoration

Holocaust Survivors presenting testimony of experiences include Miriam Lichterman and HAMEC speakers Daniel Goldsmith and Ruth Hartz.

Special thanks to:


Jewish Partisans’ Educational Foundation, San Francisco, California, USA

World ORT, London, United Kingdom

Holocaust Museum and Education Center, Elkins Park (Philadelphia), Pennsylvania, USA

In observance of Yom HaShoah

We at the Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center approach the commemoration of Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, with a renewed understanding and commitment to our mission to do everything we can to teach the lessons of the Holocaust and to prevent anything like it from happening again. Led by our intrepid and heroic Survivors we will continue to educate future generations for many years to come about the horrible consequences of unchecked hatred and intolerance. We pledge to keep going and invite you to continue to be part of our team.

Chuck Feldman, President of HAMEC